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Innovations for a Low-Carbon Economy in Asia: Past, Present, and Future

Climate Change, Energy, Energy Security, Low-carbon Technology, Regional, Technology

Innovations for a Low-Carbon Economy in Asia: Past, Present, and Future

About the Article

Innovations for a Low-Carbon Economy in Asia: Past Present, and Future, Low Carbon Transition Valter Silva, Matthew Hall and Inês Azevedo, IntechOpen, October 2018, Page 53-72.

Author

Venkatachalam Anbumozhi, Senior Energy Economist, Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia

Citation Information

Venkatachalam Anbumozhi (October 3rd 2018). Innovations for a Low-Carbon Economy in Asia: Past, Present, and Future, Low Carbon Transition Valter Silva, Matthew Hall and Inês Azevedo, IntechOpen, DOI: 10.5772/intechopen.76363. Available from: https://www.intechopen.com/books/low-carbon-transition-technical-economic-and-policy-assessment/innovations-for-a-low-carbon-economy-in-asia-past-present-and-future

Abstract

Low-carbon technology development is crucial for country’s economic and social transformation. It is often influenced by policy factors and multiple actors, both internal and external. This chapter explores the journey of low-carbon energy policymaking in four Asian countries: Based on critical analysis, three major conclusions are arrived in, about the dynamics of innovations in low-carbon energy policy making. First, a transition into a low-carbon energy economy involves distinguishable temporal and developmental phases, often characterized by hierarchy, aggregation, and space. In the initial period, technology policy choices are made to meet the growing concerns of energy security and access, later of reliability, and then of climate change. Past policies, technology-oriented top-down, are gradually being replaced or complemented by market-oriented policies. A second conclusion is that the ongoing low-carbon economic transition is enhanced by regional cooperation. Adoption of an action plan for regional energy cooperation created enabling environment for paradigm shifts in national energy policy making. Third, the flying geese model of economic integration points to a new way of regional cooperation to solve low-carbon energy policy dilemmas, with no formal involvement of policy institutions, but works according to market principles. To benefit as much as possible from that niche, developing countries need and create an environment more conducive to smooth the flow of low-carbon technology and services.

Link to the Chapter

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More Information

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Date

05 October 2018

Category

Journal Articles

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